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Inhalant Abuse Prevention
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confusedmom

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Reply with quote  #1 
I just found out tonight that my daughter does this. She is 19.
I heard something that sounded like a spray can, so I asked what the sound was. All I heard coming from her room was a sound like this....guh, guh.
I was pounding on her door, but she wouldn't answer. I went to get my husband to unlock her door. When I got back, less than a minute later, She was answering me but sounded sleepy. She finally opened the door and said nothing was going on. She looked fine. Like nothing had happened.
After some loud conversation from her and me, and then some more calmer talking, and a call to the poison control center, she did admit to her dad and I, that yes, she did inhale. And had been for a while. ?????
Now what ????
Do I call her Dr.? Where is the best place to get help for this? I need answers that work.

Thanks for your help.
QueshiaB

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Reply with quote  #2 
confusedmom- Kudos to you for being vigilant enough to know that something was not right when you heard noises but no responses.  Also, good call in contacting the poison control center during the ordeal.
 
Yes, you are correct in assuming that you will need to contact her doctor.  According to the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, long time abusers (as she admits to be) need a medical evaluation to determine if there has been any damage to vital organs (i.e. brain, liver, kidneys, etc.), and to treat any physical conditions.
 
You may also want to speak with a medical professional to see if they can suggest ways to seek treatment.  Most treatment centers with programs for adolescent substance abuse should be able to help her.  You could also do some independent research by calling the Tundra Swan Inhalant Treatment Program (http://www.ykhc.org/736.cfm) facility at 1-866-HUFFING (1-866-483-3464). Tundra Swan is the only residential program in the United States set up specifically to treat adolescents with Inhalant Abuse problems, however it is in Alaska. Nevertheless, they may be able to offer some valuable advice on what to look for in a treatment facility.

In addition to calling them, you may want to research the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention and Center for Substance Abuse Treatmentthe (branches of the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration) for valuable advice and information on treatment facilities in your area.
 
Lastly, it is important for you and your husband to remain educated on the issue of inhalant abuse, just in case your daughter asks any questions.  You should establish yourselves as a knowledgeable go to source, so she will not have to rely on her peers or media for answers.  Also, if there are other children in the house now may be a good time to speak with them about this issue.
 
I hope this helps initially!  Are there any other suggestions out there on what confusedmom should do?


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carolm

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Reply with quote  #3 

I feel your pain.  I just found out that my 15 yr old son is huffing with 2 of his friends.  One of his friends came clean and told his mother, she in turn told me and the other mother.  I asked my son, he said yea, he tried it once, and it is not a big deal.  However, I found a video of him on his cell phone, of him all messed up after huffing, and I asked him about it and he said, everything is dangerous.  And he doesn't feel that huffing is a big deal.  I know from his one friend that my son have done it twice.  And the other friend was just caught by the cops huffing.  I don't know if my son is still huffing.  I don't know what to do next. I have explained to my son, about how serious this is and how I feel about him huffing.  I no longer allow him to "hang" with his friends, he can stay in my yard and see his friends, and they may come into my house and be in his room, however the door stays open, and I have NOTHING here  that they could huff.  What do I do or say  to my son to get him not to huff?  I know he is a healthy kid that loves to work out, run 5ks, play soccer, lift weights, I've tried to explain that it will hurt his game or KILL him, but nothing works!!  HELP???  I'm a single mother, trying hard to keep my son alive!

Lew0777

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Reply with quote  #4 
Look i read your posts, and i felt such compassion that i had to sign up just too talk,
Yeah sniffing has crossed my mind before, But i feel great i didn't but what im trying to tell you is that Yeah take me for example
I may not sniff but what else do i do, How about smoke and occasionally take illegal substances Yeah im not proud but i tell you one thing you have to give kids freedom, my parents dont know
Its like i have a split personallity But yeah ive practically quit
I still drink excessive amounts of alcohol which doesnt make me big or anything
But give your kids trust Ask them to not do it and give them freedom to leave the house
If they abuse that then consider withdrawing those privilege. But dont be so hasty everyone  makes mistakes, even me . But with the support of friends i think ive kicked it so trust your children, My mum doesnt and look what happens to me Oh btw i forgot to mention im 14

QueshiaB

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Reply with quote  #5 
Carolm- Keep up the great job and continue to talk to your son and let him know he may not feel the effects now, but continued huffing is definitely effecting his body (and yes, could kill him). 

I think Lew0777 brought up a good point in saying "with the support of friends" they were able to kick the habit.  You mentioned there were 2 other boys who were abusing as well, are they still doing it?  Is there a friend of you son's you could talk to and have him relay the same messages to your son? Often, peers listen to peers (even if they're saying the exact same thing as parents)!

Another angle would be to talk to your family physician about the issue.  See if he can talk with your son from a medical standpoint about the harmful effects of huffing, or recommend any treatment facilities, etc.

Any other young people out there have any advice for what parents should say or do to get kids to stop huffing?

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babydoll7218

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Reply with quote  #6 

My 16 year old nephew whom lives with my family just wrecked his truck 3 days ago.  I found out yesterday he was inhaling computer duster & passed out.  He has sat down with us & told us that this is what happened.  Two of his friends were with him when he had his accident & of course their stories are a little different.  I've spoke to one of the parents whom he has been friends with for many years & the other is new to town.  I am almost certain that my nephew is being blamed for it all & that they didn't do it with him which is fine as long as it stops.  How do I make them understand this is serious?  My nephew says it was his first time & it didn't belong to him.  I'm not going to argue over this b/c I feel that I've caught him & now it's time to move ahead & STOP it!  I'm stressed like nothing you can believe.  Any ideas on ways to make sure it has stopped?

QueshiaB

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Reply with quote  #7 
It sounds like the communication between you and your nephew is open, or at least good enough to where he felt comfortable sitting down with you and sharing how the crash happened.

I would stress that you speak with him (and his friends) about the dangers of inhaling  and driving under the influence (side effects on vital organs, death, to name a few).

It's also important to be vigilant, and note if you see any physical, social/behavioral changes in him which could be attributed to inhalant abuse.  It's also good to monitor what he's doing whenever you can (make sure to ask where he's going when he leaves the house, who he is going to hang out with, etc).

On another note, it would be great if you could broach this subject with his school's teach, counselor or principal. Let them know kids in the community are capable of doing this, so it is important for school professionals to be educated on this issue as well.  If you want to take it a step further, you may want to suggest getting the PTA involved. 

I hope this helps initially.

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