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Inhalant Abuse Prevention
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Bloominbells

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Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #1 
Seriously, if it was me, I'd say so. It's my brother-in-law. Has been sniffing rubbing alcohol for a long time. He had a stroke last summer and has gotten a lot worse. I don't know if the sniffing was the cause of the stroke & that's why I'm here. Does anyone know if it COULD cause a stroke?
janesmith

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Posts: 581
Reply with quote  #2 
I'm not a licensed physician myself, but inhalant use is said to, unfortunately, possibly lead to a stroke ("brain attack"), which is a type of brain injury.  How difficult it must be for you (and your spouse - and his entire family) to be dealing with someone who has had a stroke and also engages in huffing.  According to the information out there, inhalant use will only worsen the effects that your brother-in-law deals with from the stroke due to the chemicals in products used for huffing being *poisons* that were never meant to go through the bloodstream.  In addition to your brother-in-law getting treatment for the stroke, I hope that he also gets outside professional help for the apparent inhalant addiction.  It's crucial to try to prevent relapse.  However, the person with the addiction has to want to get help for him/herself rather than for anyone else.  (Just an fyi that if the health insurance company believes that the patient with a stroke - or other type of injury - has a self-inflicted injury, they might not be so willing to pay for the medical claims.)  Hoping that your loved one chooses to make good, healthy choices for himself (though, essentially for his family, too).

This website may have some local counseling and treatment programs for those with addiction and/or mental health issues:

http://findtreatment.samhsa.gov/ and can type one's zip code or state of residence into search.

Please also consider attending Al-Anon meetings, which is a 12-step peer support program for the friends and family of the addict.  It may help the loved ones to "not love the addict to death."  One may attend an "open" meeting if the loved one doesn't have a drinking problem.

Their website:  http://www.al-anon.alateen.org/

There may be a local support group for the survivors of brain injury and/or the family caregivers, which may be listed on the Brain Injury Association of America website:

htth://www.biausa.org/ There should be a state association at the previous website.

To try to locate a local stroke support group, here is another website:

http://www.strokeassociation.org/STROKEORG/LifeAfterStroke/Finding-Support-You-Are-Not-Alone_UCM_308556_SubHomePage.jsp and can click "find a stroke support group in your area" or such.
Bloominbells

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Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #3 
Thank you for your help Jane. I'm afraid it's going to far. Now he's so disoriented, I'm trying to get his sister,who lives with him to call an ambulance. He needs to be admitted for emergency medical help, then help with the addiction. Thank you again, D
janesmith

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Posts: 581
Reply with quote  #4 
You're quite welcome, Bloominbells.  I'm sorry to find out that the health of your brother-in-law still seems that dire.  Please do call 9-1-1, if believing that he needs immediate medical assistance.  (I'd tried to respond to your post yesterday, but my computer was misbehaving.)  Please feel free to keep us posted about your brother-in-law, and my thoughts and prayers are with all of you.
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