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Inhalant Abuse Prevention
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Monique9722

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Posts: 1
Reply with quote  #1 
My brother is 15 years old and had a brain tumor removed in March. In his boarding school his friend started inhaling body spray through a cloth, so my brother did aswell they caught only the friend and moved him to another room. I thought that my only did that to "act" cool but I was wrong. I caught my brother doing it again after his body spray was finished he took airfreshner through the cloth. He acts completely dumb with red red eyes. I tried talking to him but did not work. What can I do or show to him that he would stop ?
janesmith

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Reply with quote  #2 
Thank you for reaching out for help!  Please keep in mind that there are certain times when a friend (or sibling) is supposed to break a confidence, including children/teen abuse or neglect, threats of suicide or homicide, or if the person is causing harm to him/herself.  Some individuals may develop a psychological and/or physical addiction to "huffing."  The chemicals in products used for huffing are actual POISONS that were never meant to go through the bloodstream, even if the chemical vapors have a pleasant scent, such as with fragrance or air freshener.

My friend actually has a severe *Brain Injury* from inhalant use at the age of 12, now in her 30s.  Please do let your mom or dad know about how your brother has engaged in huffing.  A person who inhales fumes or chemical vapors can DIE or get permanent NEUROLOGICAL (brain, spinal cord, nerves) DAMAGE, which can happen even after the very *first* time of use.

I'm not a licensed physician myself, but I'm presuming that someone who has had a brain tumor removed may even be that much more vulnerable to injury to the brain (or even fatal consequences).  Perhaps you all can talk about the risks with your family doctor (and/or board-certified neurologist), too.

In addition to this website, here are two links to a website that has more general info re: the dangers of inhalant use (and the second link has more info re: "what to do when someone is huffing"):

http://www.inhalants.org/

http://www.inhalants.org/whatodo.htm

How about showing your parents this website that may have some local counseling agencies, which can include mental health and/or addiction treatment services:

https://findtreatment.samhsa.gov/ and can type one's zip code or state of residence into search.

Their toll-free 24/7 ** referral ** hotline:

1-800-662-HELP (4357).

Erett

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Reply with quote  #3 
"Huffing" is dangerous, highly addictive, and deadly! I lost my son, age 36, on November 6, 2016, to huffing computer duster. My son had a double Engineering degree, he was the most intelligent, personable, likable, and witty person you would ever want to meet. He became addicted to huffing, after being addicted, and charged with possession of opiates, and sentenced to drug court. Huffing of duster is not detectable on a drug screen, so that became his new high. We made several "911" calls, and several trips to rehab, over a three year period, to no avail. The chemicals used in computer duster are just as addictive as OxyContin or heroin, and it can be purchased off the shelf of most any retail store for about $3.00 a can. Of coarse, most stores sell it in a double or triple pack for around $10.00, which works great for an addict, because they can't stop after just one can!! There needs to be more education and more awareness about this Russian Roulette can of poison that is available to anyone! There is a data base for those people who purchase certain cold medicine, to deter the production of meth, but duster KILLS, maybe even after the first "huff", and it can be bought in any quantity, by anyone!!
I highly recommend that you try and seek out help for inhalant abuse for your brother, it is so easily accessible and addictive, maybe more than any other drug. I believe it is becoming an epidemic, as I also have two friends, who have lost their sons this year, to huffing of duster. My prayers are with you!
janesmith

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Reply with quote  #4 
Erett - My sincere condolences in the tragic loss of your son.  I cannot imagine the pain and devastation that you feel.  Bless you for reaching out to others, which may help prevent it from happening to someone else.  You're right in that the chemicals in *any* products used as an inhalant can be very addictive, and they're so readily accessible rather than the person with the addiction having to stand on a street corner waiting for a drug dealer.  You're son's obviously very gifted.  Addiction, unfortunately, affects individuals of various educational and socio-economic backgrounds (and their families as I'm sure that you're aware).  You seem like a vigilant and dedicated parent for your son having gone to rehab several times.  Some families are in such denial about their loved one being an addict that they don't realize the need for treatment.
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