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Inhalant Abuse Prevention
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peach

Registered: 07/17/07
Posts: 1
Reply with quote  #1 

Found out recently someone i loved has been huffing for 3 years and now she is depressed and suicidal and can't stop we are taking turns watching her around the clock and took her to a doctor but what more can i do to help can she quit or does she need professional help

jannazuber

Registered: 02/21/07
Posts: 44
Reply with quote  #2 
Your friend needs professional help.  I have gathered that it is very difficult for people who are really addicted to huffing to stop.  Get her into a program that has dealt with this addiction asap.  If she doesn't die from inhalant abuse, she may well suffer long term health problems because of the damage that inhalants do to your whole body.  Do not delay.  It is a matter of life or death.  I know because we lost our fourth son at the age of 16 to air freshener over 5 years ago.  She is lucky to have caring friends.  Good luck.

Janna Zuber

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janna d zuber
heather30

Registered: 12/18/09
Posts: 1
Reply with quote  #3 

i love to huff finger nail polish i do it every day how can i stop


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i like to huff nail polish
corgidaze

Registered: 04/28/09
Posts: 122
Reply with quote  #4 
jannazuber,
I am so sorry to hear about your son...   I to lost my son, but to freon.
These kids dont realize just what their loved ones go through when we have to bury them. Its a hell they have no idea about..  If you would like feel free to email me I would love to hear about your son.   Email address is corgidaze@litewire.net

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Remember Jacob's Smile and
carry it with you in your heart
QueshiaB

Moderator
Registered: 06/16/06
Posts: 676
Reply with quote  #5 
heather30- Thanks for your post. You have taken the first step in realizing it is a problem and wanting to stop. Talk to your family, friends, classmates or anyone else in your social circle who will be there for you. For additional support you could also read through some of the post from people who have recently quit and reach out to them to see how they did it.

I hope this helps initially. Please keep us posted on your actions and progress.

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Queshia B
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janesmith

Registered: 10/16/08
Posts: 544
Reply with quote  #6 
peach -- Hoping that your loved one has since gotten outside professional help for the inhalant use.  A person can die or become permanently disabled from huffing after "just" one time, so it's crucial to get immediate help and not delay.

heather30 -- Thank you for reaching out to get help for the inhalant use.  (I typed the term "use" instead of "abuse" as one never knows when they will suffer the life-long disabling health consequences, including losing one's life.)  That is the first step to getting into recovery from an addiction.  Please call a drug treatment facility (places may be found in the "yellow pages" of the county phone book under "alcohol", "drugs", "mental health" or such), and tell them of your huffing behavior.  If a person doesn't have health insurance, some places offer state and/or county funding.  Please get outside help as soon as possible.  It can help to preserve your life and quality of life.
mynight_2000

Registered: 07/13/10
Posts: 1
Reply with quote  #7 

my wife would kill me if she knew i was on a site like this; but she wont stop nail polish remover huffing, and becomes extremely beligerant and defensive. when approached. i dont know what steps to take or how. intervention wise, i need to go; she will not be responsive or accepting of any help. what do i do please give me some definative steps

janesmith

Registered: 10/16/08
Posts: 544
Reply with quote  #8 
mynight_2000 - Thank you for posting about your wife and her apparent addiction to huffing.  You're a very caring husband to want to take a proactive approach with her in order to hopefully save her life and/or quality of life.  I'll provide a link about a family intervention (though may include bosses, coworkers, friends), but please Only consider doing so with a certified interventionist or at least a Certified Addiction Counselor (CAC).  (Just fyi that the intervention is Not usually covered by health insurance and that the process may take a few days or even longer in order for those participating in the process to practice what he/she will say to the person that has everyone so concerned.  Please also be aware that the addict is *not* typically told of the meeting beforehand so that he/she will actually show up.)

The intervention usually includes letting the addict know of the consequences if refusing to enter treatment whether it be to stop giving that person money, go forth with separation or divorce proceedings, stop all contact with the individual or such.  I'm not sure of the requirements (except for a danger to self or others) for having a loved one involuntarily committed to a (locked) psychiatric facility.  Perhaps call the local Municipal building on the next business day in order to inquire about the process. 

For more information about the intervention process:  http://www.aetv.com/intervention/learn-more/

This site has a listing of counseling and treatment programs (and some treatment facilities offer state and/or county funding for those without health insurance and according to one's financial situation):  http://findtreatment.samhsa.gov/ and can just click on the state in which one lives.

A free 12-step support group for the relatives and friends of those who use drugs is called Nar-Anon:  http://www.nar-anon.org

Al-anon is another 12-step group but is mainly for the family members and friends of the problem drinker though anyone may attend an "open" meeting and there are usually more Al-anon meetings than Nar-Anon throughout the nation:  http://www.al-anon.alateen.org
QueshiaB

Moderator
Registered: 06/16/06
Posts: 676
Reply with quote  #9 
mynight_2000- Thanks for posting and for continuing to support your wife during this tough time. janesmith gave some excellent advice which should be heeded.  You may also want to speak with  your or her doctor to see what local resources they could give you.

Continue to speak openly with her about this issue and effects abuse is having/will have on her body.  Please keep us posted.

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Queshia B
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karikar2010

Registered: 12/23/10
Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #10 

i huff rubbing alchohol and i also sniff finger nail polish remover. lately its been more of the finger nail polish remover. my boyfriend dips and hesaid he would stop and i told him i would stop huffing and all that i haven't been huffing any rubbing alchohol mainly because i'm out and i have been avoiding buying any more because i know i'll huff it. it started with just hand sanitizer and then gradually got worse i have tried to stop a couple of times and my boyfriend asked me why i do it and the truth is i don't know origianlly i like the smell of it but now its addiction. i know i can stop i have before but once i start back up its hard. i do it mostly when i am bored. i don't want to kill my brain cells but its just so hard :/

janesmith

Registered: 10/16/08
Posts: 544
Reply with quote  #11 
karikar2010 - Thank you so much for sharing your story.  The first step to getting well from addiction is actually admitting that one has a problem in which you see to have done.  (You'd mentioned that your boyfriend "dips" and I'm not sure if you're referring to smokeless tobacco or something else.)  The chemicals used for huffing may be physically as well as psychologically addictive which may, in part, by why you still feel the need to use (the substance).  Please seek outside professional help withOut delay.  No one knows when their last time will be of having a quality of life or life at all!  My friend has a Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) from huffing at the age of 12, now in her 30s.  Please be proactive in your recovery so that you can have a productive and satisfying life. 

Part of keeping one's sobriety (staying sober) means to get friendly and surround oneself with people who do NOT use any types of chemicals including alcohol.  A couple of mottos from those 12-step programs such as Narcotics Anonymous and Alcoholics Anonymous are "one day at a time" which refers to taking each day as it comes so that the notion of staying clean doesn't seem as overwhelming.  Another motto is "People, places and things" which pertains to surrounding oneself with 'people' who are into positive, healthy behaviors and who support your sobriety, the 'places' in which one goes such as NOT going to the local bar or pub which may have other people using substances and instead going to the local library, bookstore or 12-step meeting and the 'things' that one does with his or her time such as journaling, taking a class, talking with one's 12-step sponsor or taking a walk.  

This site has counseling (outpatient) and treatment programs (and some offer state and/or county funding for those without health insurance):  http://findtreatment.samhsa.gov/ and can click one's state of residence on the map.

For a free 12-step self-help group - Narcotics Anonymous:  http://www.na.org/index.php?ID=home-content-fm

Alcoholics Anonymous (and one may attend an "open" meeting if doesn't have a drinking problem):  http://www.aa.org/lang/en/meeting_finder.cfm?origpage=29  

This site has some common mottos of those 12-step programs:  http://www.royy.com/toolsofrecovery.html 

Please do get yourself some professional help and make good, healthy choices in life. 
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